Juvenile Probation
Contact

Juvenile Court Probation Services is located at Family and Juvenile Court.

  • Reception (360) 709-3131
  • FAX for Court Intake (360) 709-3190
  • FAX for Probation Counselors (360) 709-3150
Department Personnel


Name​

​Phone

​E-Mail
​Anderson, Jessica​(360) 709-3161​Email Jessica
​Campbell, Jennifer​(360) 709-3129​Email Jennifer
​Carnes, Genevieve​(360) 709-3151Email Genevieve
​Diaz, Rob​(360) 709-3194​Email Rob
​Feliciano, Pete​(360) 709-3147Email Pete
​Florek, Jenn​(360) 709-3142No Email
​Furman, David​(360) 709-3189​Email David
​Gaither, Reggie​(360) 709-3193Email Reggie
​Gilman, Mike​(360) 709-3146Email Mike
​Hanson, Dana​(360) 709-3148Email Dana
​Herbert, Jen​(360) 709-3132Email Jen
​Leland, Eric​(360) 709-3107Email Eric
​Murphy, Robert​(360) 709-3145Email Robert
​Rideout, Tammi​(360) 709-3144Email Tammi
​Schiefer, Ann​(360) 709-3124Email Ann

 

Juvenile Court Process

Washington State Juvenile Court Process for Juvenile Offenders

Arrest

​To arrest a juvenile, the police must have probable cause to believe the juvenile has committed an offense or have a valid arrest warrant.

Prosecutor's Decision

​After placing a juvenile under arrest, the police file a report with the Prosecuting Attorney's Office. The Prosecuting Attorney is a lawyer who works for the County and represents the community. The Prosecuting Attorney screens the report for legal sufficiency and decides which offense, if any, should be charged.

If the case is legally sufficient and the Prosecuting Attorney determines that charges should be filed, they may "divert" the case, or file an information with the juvenile court.

Diversion

​If the prosecutor diverts the case, the juvenile does not go to court. Instead, the juvenile meets with a diversion worker or with an "accountability board." The board is a group of people from the local area. Board members are unpaid volunteers.

The worker or board discuss the offense with the juvenile and decide on a reasonable consequence. That consequence is then incorporated into a "Diversion Agreement".

A diversion agreement may include any of the following: volunteer (unpaid) work; counseling; paying a fine; and paying "restitution." Restitution is money paid to the victim for damages they suffered as a result of an offense. It can also be the cost of paying for doctor bills if the juvenile hurt a person.

The juvenile must agree to the decision of the worker or board by signing the diversion agreement.

Information Filing

​An information is a legal document, filed with the court, that names the juvenile and describes the alleged offense.

Notice and Summons

​Subsequent to the filing of an information, a Notice and Summons is sent to the juvenile and his or her family. This notice sets the time and day for the juvenile to appear in juvenile court.

Detention Hearing

​If a youth is booked into the juvenile detention center, a detention hearing will be held on the next judicial day. This usually occurs within twenty-four hours. At this hearing, a judge decides if continued detention is necessary.

If released, the judge may set special release conditions. These conditions may include house arrest or maintaining attendance at school or work. Restrictions from associating with alleged co-defendants or victims may also be included.

Arraignment Hearing

​If the juvenile is not in detention, an arraignment is generally the first court appearance. The juvenile is advised of his or her rights and asked to either enter a plea of guilty or not guilty.

If the juvenile pleads guilty, they are admitting that they committed the offense for which they are charged. The court will then sentence the juvenile to an appropriate sentence, either at that time, or later, if the court feels it needs further information.

If the juvenile pleads not guilty, the judge will set a future date for a fact finding hearing.

Decline of Jurisdiction or Remand Hearing

​By statute, some offenses require a juvenile to automatically be remanded to adult court. After a hearing, based on a juvenile's age, criminal history and the seriousness of the alleged crime, other juveniles may also be sent to adult court.

Fact-Finding Hearing

​A fact-finding hearing or trial is held to allow the Prosecuting Attorney an opportunity to prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, that the juvenile in question committed the alleged offense. At a Fact-Finding hearing, the juvenile is generally represented by a lawyer, who attempts to present the juvenile's side of the case. The judge then decides if the case has been proven or not.

If the judge decides that the Prosecuting Attorney has not proven the case, the juvenile is found not guilty.

If the judge decides that the case has been proven, the youth will subsequently be sentenced to appropriate consequences.

Disposition Hearing

​This is a sentencing hearing. The judge determines the appropriate consequences for the offense and enters this information on a Disposition Order. This order may include detention time, a period of time on community supervision (probation), community service, monetary fines and assessments and/or restitution. Other case specific conditions may also be included. In some cases, a disposition order may include state juvenile institution time.

Counseling Programs
Aggression Replacement Training (ART)

​Aggressive behavior by children and adolescents continues to be a serious and increasing problem in our schools, on the streets, and in our communities. Aggression Replacement Training (ART) is a multimode intervention designed to alter the behavior of aggressive youth, reduce anti-social behaviors, and offer an alternative of pro-social skills. ART has been implemented across the nation since its creation in 1987. It has been the focus of many research studies and has proven to reduce offending behavior. ART is an intensive ten-week life-skills program in which the youth attends one-hour group sessions three times per week. In these sessions, participants gain tools that allow them to solve problems, make decisions, and interact positively in social situations. The ART curriculum consists of three components: Structured Learning Training (The Behavior Component), Anger Control Training (The Emotional Component), and Moral Reasoning (The Values Component).

Structured Learning Training - Is the teaching of a series of interpersonal skills that address various social situations and is an alternative to aggressive behavior. An example of a few of the skills being taught would be: "Making a Complaint", "Keeping out of Fights", and "Understanding the Feelings of Others". Each youth will role-play the skill in group and, with practice and feedback, will progress to using the skill outside the classroom.

Anger Control Training - The focus is on teaching youth self-control in dealing with their anger. Techniques for reducing and managing feelings of anger in difficult situations are introduced and role-played. The goal is to empower the youth through positive anger control methods. This enables them to have a variety of options in dealing with a problem rather than the single option of aggression.

Moral Reasoning - A new problem situation is presented to the group each week, with each group member responding to questions to the moral dilemma presented in the scenario. This component is designed to help correct the youth's thinking errors and lead him or her to see there are other ways of acting in different situations. Throughout the group discussion, youth are exposed to the different perspectives of other group members. The purpose of the discussion is to facilitate mature reasoning in order for the youth to make more mature decisions in social situations. The group does not teach values.

Functional Family Therapy (FFT)

​Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is an outcome-driven prevention/intervention program for youth who have demonstrated the entire range of maladaptive, acting-out behaviors and related syndromes. FFT is named to reflect the core unit which represents the primary focus ( family ), and an overriding allegiance to positive outcome (functional).

Program Targets: Youth, aged 11-18, at risk for and/or presenting with delinquency, violence, substance use, Conduct Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, or Disruptive Behavior Disorder.

Program Content: FFT requires as few as 8-12 hours of direct service time for commonly referred youth and their families, and generally no more than 26 hours of direct service time even for the most severe problem situations.

Delivery Modes: Flexible delivery of services by one and two person teams to clients in-home, clinic, Juvenile Court, and at time of reentry from institutional placement.
Implementation: Wide range of interventionists, including para-professionals under supervision, trained probation officers, mental health technicians, degreed mental health professionals (e.g., MSW, Ph.D., MD, RN, MFT).

This program provides youth and their families with an average of twelve sessions of family therapy. Youth who participate score moderate to high risk on the juvenile court risk assessment tool. The therapy is intended to reduce negativity and blaming within the family and to increase the family's hope that change can be accomplished. The therapy focuses on identifying obtainable goals for the family and developing a behavior change program. The therapy also encourages a generalization stage that helps the family find external support for ongoing change. The program expects to improve the family functioning and to change the youth's attitudes and skills.

Theft Prevention Circle

​Peacemaking circles are methods of dialogue, which serve to discuss particular issues, facilitate understanding, and heal broken relationships. Circles are "places of listening – of hearing what it's like to be someone else. They're also a place for being heard – for expressing what's on our minds and hearts and having others receive it deeply…The life stories are naturally transforming." (Pranis, Stuart, and Wedge, 2003, p.3) Circles operate on the principles of respect, equality and consensus-based decision making. Although circles are strongly rooted in aboriginal healing traditions, peacemaking circles are commonly used broadly to deal with crime or wrongdoings and involve various participants.

As a core component of the restorative justice process; a Talking Circle uses a structural framework to build relationships and to address conflict within a community. Talking Circles create safe spaces, build connections, and offer the community a unique means of formative assessment.

As a core component of the restorative justice process; a Talking Circle uses a structural framework to build relationships and to address conflict within a community. Talking Circles create safe spaces, build connections, and offer the community a unique means of formative assessment.

Thurston County Juvenile Court hosts a Theft Prevention Circle multiple times a year. A means of preserving the success of this program is by having the active involvement of our community members whom are serving our youth. Participants from the community include probation officers, law enforcement, loss prevention officers, educators, business owners, detention officers, and college students. We encourage members of the community to participate in order to enhance and broaden the perspective of each participant.

Early Reinstatement of Driving Privileges

​Pursuant to RCW 66.44.365, juveniles found to have committed certain alcohol and/or drug offenses may be eligible to petition the court to request reinstatement of driving privileges that were revoked pursuant to RCW 46.20.265. Revocation begins 45 days after Department of Licensing receives the Abstract of Court Record.
The Respondent must be eligible for early reinstatement of driving privileges. First offense: 90 days from start of revocation or 90 days after 16th birthday, whichever is longer. Subsequent offenses: 1 year from start of revocation or 17th birthday, whichever is longer.

The Respondent shall provide the assigned Probation Counselor or Probation Intake Unit with a signed Motion Requesting Early Reinstatement of Driving Privileges, stating the reason(s) why they are requesting the court reinstate their driving privileges.

The Probation Department will present an ex parte Order of Early Reinstatement of Driving Privileges, along with the Respondent's signed Motion Requesting Early Reinstatement of Driving Privileges to the assigned Prosecuting Attorney for review, approval and signature. If approved, both documents will be forwarded to the Judge/Court Commissioner for signature and returned to the assigned Probation/Intake Counselor.

If the early reinstatement is granted by the court, the Probation Department will inform the Department of Licensing.

You may contact your assigned Probation Counselor (if you are on active supervision) or the Juvenile Court Probation Intake Unit at 360-709-3107 to request a packet that includes the above motion and order.

The above is a general overview of the procedures for early reinstatement of driving privileges. This overview does not purport to cover all statutes and court rules that may apply to an order of early reinstatement of driving privileges.

Diversions entered PRIOR to June 12, 2008

​A person may request that the court order the records in his or her case destroyed if:

  • A person is eighteen years of age or older;
  • The person's criminal history consists entirely of one diversion agreement or counsel and release;
  • Two years have elapsed since completion of the agreement or counsel and release;
  • All diversion agreements have been successfully completed; and
  • No proceeding is pending against the person seeking the conviction of a criminal offense.

OR

  • A person is twenty-three years of age or older whose criminal history consists of only referrals for diversion;
  • All diversion agreements have been successfully completed; and
  • No proceeding is pending against the person seeking the conviction of a criminal offense.
  • The person making the motion pursuant to this subsection must give reasonable notice of the motion to the prosecuting attorney and to any agency whose records are sought to be destroyed.

In order to request the destruction of juvenile offender records, the respondent must:

  1. Notify all local law enforcement agencies in writing of his or her request to destroy the records as well as any agency whose records are sought to be destroyed.
     
  2. Complete the Affidavit, Motion and Order Destroying Juvenile Offender Records and present it to the Prosecuting Attorney's Office for their signature.
     
  3. Submit the signed Affidavit, Motion and Order to the court for the Judge or Court Commissioner's signature.
     
  4. Provide a signed, certified copy of the "Order to Destroy Juvenile Offender Records" to all agencies with whom he or she wishes to have their records destroyed. Failure to do so may result in the records remaining open.

You may contact the Juvenile Court Probation Intake Unit at 360-709-3189 to request a packet that includes the above destruction instructions, forms, motions and orders.

Diversions entered AFTER June 12, 2008

​All records maintained by any court or law enforcement agency, including the juvenile court, local law enforcement, the Washington state patrol, and the prosecutor's office, shall be automatically destroyed within ninety days of becoming eligible for destruction. Juvenile records are eligible for destruction when:

  • The person is at least eighteen years of age;
  • The person's criminal history consists entirely of one diversion agreement or counsel and release;
  • Two years have elapsed since completion of the agreement or counsel and release;
  • No proceeding is pending against the person seeking the conviction of a criminal offense; and
  • There is no restitution owing in the case.

Records may be routinely destroyed only when the person the subject of the information or complaint has attained twenty-three years of age or older. However, to ensure that the eligible records are destroyed, one should petition the court for destruction of the records.

The above is a general overview of the procedures for requesting destruction of juvenile offender records. This overview does not purport to cover all statutes and court rules that may apply to a request for destruction of juvenile offender records. It is recommended that one consult with an attorney prior to requesting the destruction of juvenile records.

Diversions entered AFTER June 7, 2018

​All records maintained by any court or law enforcement agency, including the juvenile court, local law enforcement, the Washington State Patrol, and the prosecutor's office, shall be automatically destroyed within ninety days of becoming eligible for destruction. Juvenile records are eligible for destruction when:

  • The person is at least eighteen years of age;
  • The records in question consist of successfully completed diversion agreements and counsel and release agreements, or both;
  • There is no restitution owing in the case.